‘Inside Radiolab’ will interview PSI Director and other Puget Sound area panelists

1280px-WNYC_Radiolab_logo.svgOur Director Joel Baker is part of a panel of four environmental leaders in Puget Sound who will be interviewed onstage at the Inside Radiolab show next week in Tacoma. Radiolab’s Robert Krulwich will host the January 22nd event at the Pantages Theater where he will interview panelists about Northwest water issues.

In addition to Baker, other panelists include Jennifer Chang of the Puyallup Watershed Initiative, Ryan Mello, Executive Director of Pierce Conservation District and Sheida Sahandy, Executive Director of the Puget Sound Partnership.

Radiolab’s quirky take on science has made it one of the Internet’s most popular podcasts, with more than 4 million downloads. It is also broadcast on over 450 public radio stations around the country. The live theater presentation will go behind the scenes of the show, with Krulwich talking about how he and his co-host Jad Abumrad create some of radio’s most compelling science journalism. The show begins at 7:30.

Read more about the event.

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Auklet recordings featured on Living on Earth

Examining an auklet chick near artificial burrow (Photo: Jeff Rice)

Examining an auklet chick near artificial burrow (Photo: Jeff Rice)

The Puget Sound region is home to one of the largest nesting colonies of rhinoceros auklets in the world. Each summer tens of thousands of these puffin-like birds raise their chicks on Protection Island in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. You can listen to the sounds of this summer ritual on PRI’s Living on Earth this week. The recording was made in collaboration with the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound.

Visit Living on Earth‘s website to view the full feature.

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The watershed: Winter bat recordings

BIG BROWN BAT (Eptesicus fuscus), IN FLIGHT AT NIGHT, ROGUE RIVER NATIONAL FOREST, OREGON

Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus). Photo: Angell Williams (CC BY 2.0) https://www.flickr.com/photos/53357045@N02/4973650026

Bats are thought of as warm weather creatures, but recent studies have shown that they can be active throughout the winter. Here in the Puget Sound region, bat echolocations have been recorded in temperatures in the low teens, and are commonly heard during more mild conditions. Continue reading

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Shoreline armoring forum now available on video

Shoreline armoring along railroad. Photo: NOAA.

Shoreline armoring along railroad. Photo: NOAA.

More than 125 planners and scientists gathered for a May 20th forum focusing on the latest scientific studies of shoreline armoring in Puget Sound. A video of forum presentations is now available online (below).

“Armoring” refers to hardened structures designed to protect shorelines against natural processes like erosion and storm surge, and it is common throughout the region. Almost 30% of the Puget Sound shoreline—about 700 miles total—is now classified as armored, and the figure grows by a mile or more per year.

Scientists have been wondering for some time how this trend is affecting the ecology of Puget Sound, and the Puget Sound Partnership has made reduction of shoreline armoring one of the centerpieces of its recovery efforts. Studies are increasingly pointing to armoring’s negative effects, but the science has not always been definitive. That was the motivation behind the recent Salish Sea Shoreline Forum at South Seattle Community College where scientists and planners gathered to discuss their research.

Salish Sea Nearshore Conference #3 from Salish Sea Shoreline Forum Video on Vimeo.

Continue reading

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BirdNote features auklet recordings

Several Rhinoceros Auklet recordings from the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound are featured on the national radio show BirdNote this month. PSI’s Jeff Rice recorded the sounds during a trip to Protection Island with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. The island is home to one of the largest nesting colonies of rhinoceros auklets in the world, and scientists are studying the birds to identify overall patterns in ecosystem health. Listen online.

Rhinoceros Auklet. Photo copyright Bob Whitney. Courtesy of BirdNote.

Rhinoceros Auklet. Photo copyright Bob Whitney. Courtesy of BirdNote.

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Download the SSEC mobile app

A new mobile app for the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference

A new mobile app for the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference.

Go paperless at SSEC14. The first-ever Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference mobile app is now available. Get the full conference schedule online. Don’t have a smartphone? Simply use the web version at the same link. The Puget Sound Institute built the app using CrowdCompass software with funding from the Puget Sound Partnership.

Download the app here. 

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Pre-conference flyover

 

The latest surface conditions report from Eyes Over Puget Sound

The latest surface conditions report from Eyes Over Puget Sound

One of the sessions at next week’s conference will feature a talk about the Department of Ecology’s popular Eyes Over Puget Sound program. This innovative program gathers monthly aerial views of Puget Sound surface conditions, and their latest report is now available.

You can hear the talk at the May 2nd SSEC session “Emerging tools for synthesizing and communicating ecosystem information.” Or check out an audio slideshow about Eyes Over Puget Sound featuring Dr. Christopher Krembs of Ecology’s Marine Monitoring Unit.

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PSI publishing mobile app for Salish Sea conference

A new mobile app for the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference

A new mobile app for the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference

PSI’s Encyclopedia of Puget Sound has been chosen to publish the official mobile app for the upcoming Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference in Seattle. The app will allow users to customize their schedules, network with conference participants and receive real-time news about conference events. It will be available for all devices and will be the first time a mobile app has been developed specifically for the biennial conference.

EoPS is creating the app with the help of developers at CrowdCompass with funding support from the Puget Sound Partnership. The Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference is the region’s premier gathering dedicated to the science and policy of Salish Sea ecosystem recovery. The conference will be held April 30 – May 2, 2014 at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle.

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Burke exhibit traces Elwha restoration

Book cover for "Elwha: A River Reborn" by Lynda Mapes. The Burke Museum exhibit runs from November 23, 2013 to March 9, 2014.

Book cover for “Elwha: A River Reborn” by Lynda Mapes. The exhibit based on the book runs from November 23, 2013 to March 9, 2014.

This month, the University of Washington’s Burke Museum opens the exhibit Elwha: A River Reborn, based on the book by Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes, with photography by Steve Ringman. The exhibit tells the story of the largest dam removal in U.S. history, and PSI’s Jeff Rice spoke with Mapes about her experience covering the story, her recent book, and the upcoming exhibit. Read the interview at the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound. 

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Eyes Over Puget Sound

Take a flight with Dr. Christopher Krembs of Eyes Over Puget Sound. View an audio slideshow on the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound Youtube channel.

The float plane prepares to take off. Photo by Jeff Rice.

The float plane prepares to take off. Photo by Jeff Rice.

Eyes Over Puget Sound distributes a popular monthly report combining high resolution aerial photographs with satellite and ground-truthed monitoring data for Puget Sound surface conditions. The program was started by Dr. Krembs of the Department of Ecology’s Marine Monitoring Unit to take advantage of a routine transit flight between Seattle and Olympia. Four times a month, the plane flies to Olympia to pick up members of Ecology’s water monitoring team to conduct sampling at 40 sites throughout Puget Sound. Krembs uses the opportunity, and the unique vantage point, to photograph and report on surface conditions ranging from the latest algal blooms to jellyfish migrations and oil spills.

A while back, Dr. Krembs graciously allowed us to ride along on one of these flights and take some pictures of our own. Read more about Eyes Over Puget Sound on PSI’s Encyclopedia of Puget Sound. Special thanks to Dr. Krembs and Kenmore Air for the opportunity to join the flight.

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