Kelly Biedenweg appointed Lead Social Scientist at PSI

Kelly Biedenweg, Ph.D.

Kelly Biedenweg

Dr. Kelly Biedenweg has been appointed Lead Social Scientist at the Puget Sound Institute, with funding from the National Science Foundation and the Puget Sound Partnership. As part of her role at the Institute, she will develop critical social science to support recovery of the Puget Sound, immediately focusing on the development and testing of Quality of Life (HWB) indicators.

“I am extremely pleased that Kelly decided to base her research program at the UW Puget Sound Institute,” said Institute Director Joel Baker.” The Puget Sound restoration effort will benefit greatly by the integration of social and natural sciences.” Continue reading

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Marc Mangel joins International Pacific Halibut Commission Scientific Review Board

International Pacific Halibut Commission

Puget Sound Institute Visiting Scientist Marc Mangel recently joined the International Pacific Halibut Commission Scientific Review Board. The Commission researches and manages stocks of Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepsis) for the United States and Canada, and the Scientific Review Board is a new initiative that will participate in evaluation of staff science and recommend new or alternative research. Dr. Mangel will also assist in evaluating the results of a new Management Strategy Evaluation process for halibut. Continue reading

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The Center for Urban Waters welcomes summer interns

The Puget Sound Instititute and the Center for Urban Waters welcome seven student interns this summer. This is the third year for our internship program, which offers students and recent graduates the chance to work with post-doctoral, and professional scientists on a range of research projects— from field sampling and lab work to multimedia production for the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound. Interns this year hail from the University of Washington Tacoma, Brown University, Reed College and Whitman College, and we are excited to work with this talented group.

 

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Listen to the Mazama Pocket Gopher

Mazama pocket gopher. Photo by Bill Leonard.

Mazama pocket gopher. Photo by Bill Leonard.

The South Puget Sound area was once the site of thriving prairie and oak savannas, but these native grasslands are now “among the most endangered ecological communities in North America,” according to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Less than 8% of this habitat still remains (with only about 2-3% still dominated by native plants), and as it disappears, so do the species that depend on it. Among these are the threatened Mazama Pocket Gopher.  Continue reading

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