The secret lives of forage fish: Where do they go when we aren’t looking?

Pacific sand lance at rest on sand. Photo: Collin Smith, USGS. https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgeologicalsurvey/13378704834

Pacific sand lance at rest on sand. Photo: Collin Smith, USGS.

Some of the most important fish in the Salish Sea food web are also the most mysterious. Researchers have only begun to understand how many there are, where they go, and how we can preserve their populations for the future. University of Washington researcher Margaret Siple reports on the secret lives of forage fish in the latest issue of Salish Sea Currents. 

Read the article in the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound.

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Paper looks at social–ecological approaches to herring management

Graphic from 'Thirty-two essential questions for understanding the social–ecological system of forage fish: the case of Pacific Herring'

Graphic from ‘Thirty-two essential questions for understanding the social–ecological system of forage fish: the case of Pacific Herring’

A new paper co-authored by PSI’s Tessa Francis connects social and ecological factors influencing herring management in the Salish Sea. The paper, published in the journal Ecosystem Health and Sustainability, grew out of a three-day workshop held last year in British Columbia. The workshop was sponsored by The Ocean Modeling Forum, a collaboration between the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries. It brought together a variety of herring experts, from commercial fishermen to scientists, regulators and members of regional tribes. NOAA’s Phillip Levin was the paper’s lead author, with Nathan Taylor of Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Tessa Francis, lead ecosystem ecologist at PSI, as co-authors.

Citation:

Levin, Phillip S., Francis, Tessa B., Taylor, Nathan G. (2016) Thirty-two essential questions for understanding the social–ecological system of forage fish: the case of Pacific Herring. Ecosystem Health and Sustainability. 2(4):e01213. doi: 10.1002/ehs2.1213.

Related article:

Ocean Modeling Forum to bring human element to herring fishery, others (UW Today)

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Herring fishery’s strength is in the sum of its parts, study finds

Young adult herring from Puget Sound.Margaret Siple/University of Washington

Young adult herring from Puget Sound.Margaret Siple/University of Washington

The online publication UW Today reports on a recent paper co-authored by PSI research scientist Tessa Francis. The paper, published in the journal Ocealogia, describes how individual herring populations in Puget Sound exhibit a portfolio effect, collectively influencing and stabilizing the region’s population as a whole. Francis teamed up with the paper’s lead author UW doctoral student Margaret Siple to analyze more than 40 years of herring data on 21 subpopulations in Puget Sound.

Read the feature in UW Today.

Citation:

Siple, M. C., & Francis, T. B. (2016). Population diversity in Pacific herring of the Puget Sound, USA. Oecologia, 180(1), 111-125.

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Is there a shift in the Puget Sound food web?

Jellyfish surround a floatplane pontoon. Photo courtesy of Washington Department of Ecology.

Jellyfish surround a floatplane pontoon. Photo courtesy of Washington Department of Ecology.

A Seattle Times story features a recent paper in the Marine Ecology Press Series about shifting baselines in the Puget Sound food web. Forty years of data from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife reveal a trend toward more jellyfish and less of some forage fish species in the region. High amounts of jellyfish can mean a decline in ecosystem productivity, according to scientists. The original paper was based on some of the same data used by Puget Sound Institute researchers looking at trends for Puget Sound’s Pacific herring populations.

Read the article in the Seattle Times.

Read the original journal article.

 

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