A catalyst for ecosystem recovery

The University of Washington Puget Sound Institute provides analysis, research and communication to inform and connect the science of ecosystem protection.

The big picture: Our comprehensive approach

Ecosystem management in Puget Sound has become increasingly complex. Scientists now recognize that what happens on the land is intricately tied to the health of the water. We face climate change and unprecedented population growth, and researchers have identified thousands of different human-caused pressures on the ecosystem. Given limited resources, how can managers and policymakers make informed decisions about where to focus their recovery efforts?

More: About PSI

 

The Puget Sound Institute provides expertise across three major areas:

1. Science for policy

Technical assistance to resource managers and policymakers
PSI and our partners receive major funding from the Environmental Protection Agency to support and enhance new strategies for improving the health of Puget Sound.

More: Science for policy

United States Environmental Protection Agency

Puget Sound Partnership

human wellbeing indicator wheel
The human wellbeing indicator wheel was developed to provide a social science perspective on ecosystem management.

2. Research

Scientific studies
Our expertise is strongly grounded in original research. Since 2010, PSI scientists along with our collaborators at the Center for Urban Waters have published on a range of topics, including the ecology of forage fish, stormwater, microplastics, social science and emerging contaminants.

More: Research and products

3. Communication

Trusted, decision-critical information
We bring together scientific findings from around the region through synthesis, study panels, technical peer-reviews and publications such as the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound and Salish Sea Currents.

More: Connecting the science

Browse: Encyclopedia of Puget Sound

A collection of Salish Sea Currents printed flyers.
Salish Sea Currents stories are published online in the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound and also printed as annual booklets and flyers.

 


Recent blog posts

A mile of shellfish beach near Hoodsport has been declared safe for harvesting

May 12, 2021
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Efforts to clean up the waters near Hoodsport in southern Hood Canal are paying off with increased shellfish-harvesting opportunities for the Skokomish Tribe, private property…

Rep. Derek Kilmer expresses optimism about future funding for Puget Sound recovery

April 28, 2021
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Federal support for Puget Sound recovery is on the rise, and there is growing hope that the Sound’s ecological problems will receive increased consideration and…

State agencies will focus on improving environmental justice under new law

April 23, 2021
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A person’s health should not be determined by their income, race or ethnic background nor by the neighborhood in which they live, according to basic…

Book cover

‘Homewaters’ blends natural and cultural history of Puget Sound

April 21, 2021
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A new book explores our complicated connection to the ecosystem that we call home. We interview author David B. Williams about Homewaters: A Human and…

Environmental justice on the move: a few personal observations about change

April 16, 2021
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I recently completed a much-involved writing project focused on environmental justice. It has been one of the most challenging, yet for me enlightening, efforts in…

Two science and monitoring funding opportunities from the Puget Sound Partnership

April 14, 2021
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From the Puget Sound Partnership: Announcing Two Science and Monitoring Funding Opportunities from the Puget Sound Partnership  The Partnership is pleased to announce two solicitations…

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