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New papers from PSI researchers focus on ecosystem services and human ecology

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New papers from Puget Sound Institute researchers run the gamut from studies of ecosystem services and management to human ecology and river recreation in the Puget Sound lowland.

PSI Visiting Scholar Bill Labiosa is co-author on a recent paper in the International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services and Management, “Modeling benefits from nature: using ecosystem services to inform coastal and marine spatial planning.”

The paper looks at an ecosystem services framework for marine ecosystems, and describes the marine Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST), “a new tool to assess (i.e., map, model, and value) multiple services provided by marine ecosystems.” It describes results from an application of InVEST to the West Coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

The article is available in the journal International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management, Vol. 8, Iss. 1-2, 2012. Authors include: Anne D. Guerry, Mary H. Ruckelshaus, Katie K. Arkema, Joey R. Bernhardt, Gregory Guannel, Choong-Ki Kim, Matthew Marsik, Michael Papenfus, Jodie E. Toft, Gregory Verutes, Spencer A. Wood, Michael Beck, Francis Chan, Kai M.A. Chan, Guy Gelfenbaum, Barry D. Gold, Benjamin S. Halpern, William B. Labiosa, Sarah E. Lester, Phil S. Levin, Melanie McField, Malin L. Pinsky, Mark Plummer, Stephen Polasky, Peter Ruggiero, David A. Sutherland, Heather Tallis, Andrew Day, Jennifer Spencer

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Kelly Biedenweg, a Visiting Scientist from Stanford has recently published on a number of topics, ranging from studies of riparian management and river recreation to human ecology in the Bolivian Amazon. Biedenweg will be working at the PSI to explore systematic methods for incorporating social and cultural values into ecosystem-based management planning.

Her paper “Balancing Riparian Management and River Recreation: Methods for studying recreation and the relative risk of large wood,” was co-authored by Kate Akyuz and Rebecca Steele, and was published in the August 2012 issue of Environmental Management. The paper looks at ways that boaters on the Cedar River in the Puget Sound lowland interact with large wood (such as large logs and felled plants) used by resource managers to stabilize riverbanks and provide habitat for salmon. Her study “tested methods for describing and estimating the number of river floaters, where they float in relationship to river projects, the risks they take while floating, and their perceptions of large wood in the river.”

Citation:

Biedenweg, K., K. Akyuz and B. Skeele.  2012. Balancing Riparian Management and River Recreation: Methods for studying recreation and the relative risk of large wood. Environmental Management 50:2, 283-295.

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Other recent papers by Dr. Biedenweg include:

Biedenweg, K. and M.C. Monroe.  In Press.  Teasing Apart the Details: What characteristics of capacity building projects influence community forest management in the Bolivian Amazon?  Human Ecology.

Biedenweg, K. and M.C. Monroe.  In Press. Using Cognitive Methods to Explore Shared Perspectives as a Result of Social Learning in the Bolivian Amazon. Society and Natural Resources.

Biedenweg, K.  In Press (2012).  A Framework for Evaluating Forest Conservation Implications of Community-based Capacity Building: Experiences from the Northern Bolivian Amazon. Conservation and Society.