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Bull Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana), the only surface canopy species in the Puget Sound, observed in March 2018. Photo: Brian Allen
Bull Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana), the only surface canopy species in the Puget Sound, observed in March 2018. Photo: Brian Allen

Kelp continues steady decline in Puget Sound

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This week marks the beginning of an occasional series we’ll be producing on findings from the 2018 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference in Seattle. Last month, we sent more than a dozen student and professional writers to the conference to gather stories on the latest science influencing Puget Sound recovery. We’ll be rolling those stories out over the next few months, and we kick things off with a report by PSI senior writer Christopher Dunagan. He writes that scientists are trying to learn how to restore Puget Sound’s diminishing kelp forests in an effort to stave off habitat loss for rockfish and other threatened species. Its a fascinating look at one of Puget Sound’s foundational species, the bull kelp, which can grow as much as two inches per day.

Read the story in Salish Sea Currents.