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In laboratory experiments, a pteropod shell dissolved over the course of 45 days in seawater adjusted to an ocean chemistry projected for the year 2100. Photo: NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory
In laboratory experiments, a pteropod shell dissolved over the course of 45 days in seawater adjusted to an ocean chemistry projected for the year 2100. Photo: NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

Rate of ocean acidification may accelerate, scientists warn

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Last summer, scientists met at the University of Washington to address alarming findings concerning the rapid acidification of the world’s oceans. Experts at that symposium warned that wildlife in the Salish Sea, from salmon to shellfish, may start to see significant effects from changing water chemistry within the next 10 to 20 years. PSI senior writer Christopher Dunagan reports on the symposium’s key findings.

Read the article in Salish Sea Currents.

Editor’s note: This article  was commissioned and edited by the Washington Ocean Acidification Center which hosted the symposium. Funds for the article were provided by the Washington state legislature. A version of this article was originally published by the Washington Ocean Acidification Center.